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Theories Of Ed Psych

Across
Skinner: the idea that behavior is determined by its consequences, be they reinforcements or punishments, which make it more or less likely that the behavior will occur again.
Bloom splits learning behaviors into the areas, or domains, known as cognitive, affective and psychomotor development. An understanding of what each of these categories entails is helpful when applying Bloom’s theories in the classroom
Leo Vygotsky primarily explains that socialization affects the learning process in an individual. It tries to explain consciousness or awareness as the result of socialization. This means that when we talk to our peers or adults, we talk to them for the sake of communication
Erikson: is a comprehensive psychoanalytic that identifies a series of eight stages, in which a healthy developing individual should pass through from infancy to late adulthood.
Developed by psychologist Lawrence Kohlberg, this theory made us understand that morality starts from the early childhood years and can be affected by several factors.
Pavlov summed it up like this: there's a neutral stimulus (the bell), which by itself will not produce a response, like salivation. There's also a non-neutral or unconditioned stimulus (the food), which will produce an unconditioned response (salivation)
Bandura: posits that people learn from one another, via observation, imitation, and modeling. The theory has often been called a bridge between behaviorist and cognitive learning theories because it encompasses attention, memory, and motivation
Down
Piaget: the sensorimotor, preoperational, concrete operational and formal operational period.
Bruner: Enactive, which is the representation of knowledge through actions. Iconic, which is the visual summarization of images. Symbolic representation, which is the use of words and other symbols to describe experiences.
Edward Thorndike (1874 - 1949) is famous in psychology for his work on learning theory that lead to the development of operant conditioning within behaviorism. Whereas classical conditioning depends on developing associations between events, operant conditioning involves learning from the consequences of our behavior
proposed by Abraham Maslow in his 1943 paper "A Theory of Human Motivation" in Psychological Review. Maslow subsequently extended the idea to include his observations of humans' innate curiosity.
Gardner chose eight abilities that he held to meet these criteria: musical-rhythmic, visual-spatial, verbal-linguistic, logical-mathematical, bodily-kinesthetic, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and naturalistic. He later suggested that existential and moral intelligence may also be worthy of inclusion.